The Evolution of an American Fighter

On  October 26 of 1955, in reply to a letter from the Editor of Ottowa Hills’ High School Spectator, E.E. Cummings penned (A POET’S ADVICE TO STUDENTS.)  In it, the rebellious Man of Letters expressed:

To be nobody-but-yourself – in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else – means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.”

 

Spring 1978: A South Louisiana graduate, bound for debauchery with a long-time best friend – 70 degrees, top-down Jensen Healy, 85 MPH midway on highway 61 between Baton Rouge & New Orleans. Midnight. Suddenly a dim, hazy mirage of bubbling asymmetrical lighting in the rearview becomes 20 plus marginal headlights, surrounded by a Thor-like pounding offbeat thrum, rheostatically growing in volume until, in perfect formation, the sons of silence brazenly shoot past on ultra-lean, stripped, triangulated forms. An idea is planted.

Spring 1978: A South Louisiana graduate, bound for debauchery with a long-time best friend – 70 degrees, top-down Jensen Healy, 85 MPH midway on highway 61 between Baton Rouge & New Orleans. Midnight. Suddenly a dim, hazy mirage of bubbling asymmetrical lighting in the rearview becomes 20 plus marginal headlights, surrounded by a Thor-like pounding offbeat thrum, rheostatically growing in volume until, in perfect formation, the sons of silence brazenly shoot past on ultra-lean, stripped, triangulated forms. An idea is planted.

1991 – 1992:  Confederate Motors was born.  Conceived of a relentless romantic passion for the American Way.  Conceptualized, for nine months, within the scope of non-materialism, principled individualism, and the nuturance of actualized creativity.  And made flesh by an uncompromising band of poets.  The fight began.

Friday, November 11, 1994:  Veteran’s Day - The First Confederate Motorcycle was fired up, leaving in its dust, all doubt.

Friday, November 11, 1994: Veteran’s Day – The First Confederate Motorcycle was fired up, leaving in its dust, all doubt.

 1994 to 2005:  First in Baton Rouge and later on Carondelet Street in New Orleans, Confederate Motors designed, hand-crafted, and sold the finest street motorcycles it is possible to craft.

Monday, August 29, 2005:  Disaster.  Hurricane Katrina blew-out the west side wall of Confederate’s 140 year old studio, collapsing the roof on everything inside.  Declared . . . a total loss.

Monday, August 29, 2005: Disaster. Hurricane Katrina blew-out the west side wall of Confederate’s 140 year old studio, collapsing the roof on everything inside. Declared . . . a total loss.

2008:  Noise dissipated, minds opened, spirits re-energized, pride emancipated by defeat: a determined band of Confederates and students of perseverance, guided by the resonant voice of undiluted truth, paid homage to Mr. Cummings’ advise.  With a machine whose skeletall- spare, warrior aesthetic captured the imagination of motoring purists and afficianados worldwide, they refused to give up – ever.  That machine, was named The Fighter.

2014: The Fight continues through the genius of an International Rebel, Pierre Terblanche.

 

Spoils of the Fight

 

Neiman Marcus Christmas Book of 2008

The Fighter was honored as a feature gift presentation in the prestigious Neiman Marcus Christmas Book of 2008.

 

Some bikes are part of a scene. Others, like the P120 Fighter Black Flag, are  the scene. Cranking 160 horsepower from its 120-cubic-inch radial twin, Confederate Motor’s latest not only guns it and runs it but also blazes a distinct and stylized path in American motorcycling.”    Los Angeles Times Business

 

 

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See the Fighter on White Collar: here

 

 

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